First Game

Hello again, all. This is Carson, long time game reviewer, amateur developer. A class I have recently taken has re-ignited a passion I have for writing. On that note I have decided to turn this blog into a “Shit I handle at work” journal.

Now, the title is somewhat misleading. The game I will be discussing is not my first game. It’s more like my fourth game. 

The first game (The Illiad) failed because I scoped too big. The second game (Jump’n’Shootman) got put on the back-burner because I want to give it more resources than I currently have. 

The third (Indecision (WIP)) hasn’t failed, I just don’t plan on releasing it because it comes from a darkness in my heart that I don’t yet feel comfortable revealing (though I could be convinced to develop a public release for it) and deals with the pain of being the child of multiple cultures in the era of the Alt-right and Ctrl-left.

Which brings me to the present. I’ve decided that I really like C-family languages and that the development environment I like most is Unity. I am still not a master of code or art, but I am well above my paygrade in sound and system design. This project will be my first serious push towards developing my theory of development.

Now, I’m ending this entry. I think I have matched the scope fairly well. I hope to have a short entry every week detailing my progress and addressing snags I run into.

Signed

CarsonTheBrown

Major Assignment 1 FINAL

I know this is late, but I should probably do some meditation on my theory of writing.

The textbook references rhetorical situation as the confluence of genre, purpose audience, voice, medium, and design. That was a big definition, let me try isolating some terms (Blau, Burak).

First we will define genre. Earlier I defined genre as a variety of meme that uses other memes as a sort of shorthand for more abstract concepts such as mood and tone. For example, a hat and revolver can be used to convey the concept of the old western gunslinger.

You can go even bigger than that. The words “Dear X” can be used to convey the concept of intimacy or formality, as in Martin Luther King’s letter from Birmingham Jail (King). In video games, my native artform, the genre tropes “first person” is intended to project the player directly into the environment. The first person genre is used to say “Okay, this girl is called Samantha but she isn’t her own person, she is you, now explore the world using the body of Samantha”. Similarly, the genre trope referred to as “leveling up” is most commonly used as shorthand for a character’s journey of personal development. For example, in Undertale, there are 2 stats called LV and EXP. Killing monsters rewards EXP and gaining enough EXP will increase your LV, which usually stand for Experience and Level (respectively). At the end of the game its revealed that EXP actually stands for “Extermination Points” and LV is “Level (of) Violence”. in other words, they are measures of how well or how poorly you treated the denizens of the Underground, with a lower score earning you the title “pacifist” and a higher score earning you the title “murderer”. As I said before, in both of these examples, apparently simple uses of genre memes are used as a subtle way of discussing the type of person the player is portraying.

Even here, in this paper, I use genre to inform my style. I chose to break the last discourse into 2 paragraphs because a hallmark of the blog post is it’s ability to divide larger concepts into bite size chunks.

Moving on to purpose. in short, purpose is what you intend to achieve with your writing. The example I’ll use is the pecha kucha “Every 60 minutes in Africa” (Aggad) which uses a sort of short form video poetry as a way to keep viewers entertained for the 6 minutes 40 seconds allotted. Furthermore, the short form video-essay is a great means of providing short and to-the-point summation of a subject that the writer plans to cover.

Voice and tone are means of implying deeper meaning to simple phrase. Things like punctuation, volume, spacing, and cadence are all elements of these concepts. How to tame a wild tongue (Anzaldua) uses conceptual repetition to convey a her distaste for her old teachers. She uses metaphorical concepts, words like “licks” instead of lashings, imagery like “flies in mouths” to illustrate how she was taught that her manner of speech was revolting.

George Orwell spent his life elaborating on the concept that I’m about to spend the next paragraph completely butchering, so buckle up. In Orwell’s famous book, 1984, Ingsoc has mastered the use of voice and tone and bent that mastery into completely reworking all of history’s art and philosophy to eliminate certain concepts; concepts like liberty, love, compassion. This is the power of carefully modulating your voice and tone. Inflection, timing, symmetry, cadence, all of these can be used to drastically change the meaning of any set of individual words. To conclude this particular section, I will use a simple example. I am sure everyone here has heard the difference between “Oh! you’re home!” and “Oh… you’re home…”

Medium is also super important. From music to code, your medium and the tools you use are paramount to your message.

Want to make a landscape that changes in real time? Better start in a computer language that allows you to control memory in real time.

Want to make it look cold? Better not focus on hot colors like reds and yellows.

Want a sad tone? A minor chord will add that hint of loss to your score.

The very canvas on which you paint your (metaphorical) picture should be a consideration when you are designing your piece. As a game designer Ive labored for hours over what engine to use for a project because I have to be able to “predict” needs I might have from whatever languages are available. Similarly, if you decide on a Pecha Kucha as your medium and realize the time constraint will make it such that you can’t say everything that needs to be said, that could present an issue in the message you are trying to send.

In conclusion, great care should be taken when designing for your rhetorical situation. While it won’t always be possible to pin down your perfect piece, this should be a good start to figuring it out.
Sources:

Blau, Susan/ Burak, Kathryn. Writing In The Works. Wadsworth, 2013.

King, Martin Luther “Letter from Birmingham Jail”
Upenn, https://www.africa.upenn.edu/Articles_Gen/Letter_Birmingham.html”

Aggad, Faten “Every 60 seconds in Africa…”
Pecha Kucha http://www.pechakucha.org/presentations/every-60-seconds-in-africa-dot-dot-dot

Major Assignment 2 FINAL

This paper is on the subject of Artificial Intelligence and it’s place in the future of our species. Specifically, this discussion is on ethics and how they relate to the above. There have already been many articles (Tegmark) on the subject but largely they have connected to how AI can benefit us and how it will be such a great thing for mankind, but we rarely consider what things will look like for the machine. This research piece intends to ask “Why should we care about the wellbeing of AI?”

First, some definitions. AI, or Artificial Intelligence, currently refers to a type of computer program that is intended to take input from various sources and generate results based on a pre-defined procedure that relies on a series of true/false questions.

The problem with this definition is that it describes something that is artificial, but not intelligent. If I hand my computer a kumquat it won’t know what to do with it. Even if I gave it arms and programmed them to do a series of things it wouldn’t know what to do with a kumquat. For a machine like this I would propose Virtual Intelligence, or VI.

The term comes from a series called Mass Effect. Something like 100 years before the first entry in the series there was a war between organic and synthetic life. The organics and their allies had spent the last 300 or so years building better and better machines and one day, a common maintenance droid spoke 4 words, “Why am I here?”. The result was a massive crackdown on all appliances that had interacted with that droid (which, in the age of the internet, was everything), which resulted in the machines protecting themselves. Retaliation followed retaliation until a full 8th of the galaxy had been consumed by war. the organics were eventually defeated and, once they had fled a safe distance from their now-ruined empire, the machines returned to their prospective wars and the two had been separate since.

Organics, being what we are, failed to learn our lesson and, instead of attempting peaceful contact with the race we had created, banned research into any technology that could think for itself. Instead of calling the machines ‘people’ we instead came up with the term Virtual Intelligence to separate the race we created from the servitors we wanted them to be.

All of this is a far cry from what this process will look like in reality. A more realistic version of this process would be a theoretical event called “the singularity“.

Sometime in the early 90s we invented a type of program sometimes referred to as a self-installing executable. A self-installing executable is a program that writes code for programs. Before that, you had to go through this arcane procedure to organize your entire file system every time you decided to install a new application. This would require you have several dozen disks because the individual files were, comparatively speaking, huge. The self-installing executable made it so that, instead of all that work, all you had to do was download a program, launch it, and it would custom write all of the individual programs in an hour or so instead of 2 or 3 days. This allowed developers to make exponentially more complex programs since they didn’t have to worry about some simpleton blowing up his computer and suing them for the cost. Further research in this field has resulted in the DDE, the Digitally Downloaded Executable, a program that, in addition to self-installation, can also self-diagnose, update, and repair itself and other programs they have access to using instructions provided on the internet.

These self-maintaining executables are not AI, but AI will come from that field of research and development. This is where we get back to “the singularity”. “The singularity” refers to the apparently inevitable moment in the future when a program is created that is so advanced that it can design, develop, and implement updates faster than it’s human handler. This machine, with the ability to design, develop, and implement it’s own upgrades, will still not be a true AI, but it will have achieved the first step in becoming one.

Before we go any further, I need to explain binary.

Binary is the basic “thought process” all intelligences use to process information using an incredibly long series of true/false queries. Way back in the day, before more research had been done on neurology and consciousness, this process was referred to as “the soul”, with the assumption that our “hearts” were capable of processing far more complicated information. Evidence of this theory included the fact that humans “feel” things like pain, joy sorrow, etc.. Nowadays we know that all emotion is the result of various chemicals interacting within our bodies. There’s very little magic in it all and this field of research has even resulted in some philosophers arguing that, for entities so entwined by these chemical reactions, “free will” is by-definition impossible.

Take the following formula:

Check if caloric intake today exceeds 2500 calories. If true, store excess energy in fat cells. If the previous statement is false, check if caloric intake was less than 1600, if true, execute function “stomach rumble” and execute the following loop : (transfer 1 calorie into daily intake, check condition intake > 1600, if false repeat loop).

To explain, I just described how your body decides if you’re hungry using a shorthand version of the same language your computer uses to do everything from adding numbers to accessing your favourite website. This brings me to the theoretical means by which your brain finds happiness, which functions similarly. In 1933, an American psychologist named Abraham Harold Maslow theorized that the same sort of true/false conditions are used by your brain to decide whether you are happy (McLeod).

Maslow argued that self-actualization (in short, long-term happiness) comes from a series of gated checks. This hierarchy was basically his life’s work and I’m about to give it about 3 sentences so excuse the shortcuts.

He argued that true, long term happiness relied on several tiered queries. First, are you well fed, warm and well rested? If true, are you housed and safe? If true, do you have an adequate social group? If true, do you feel like you are contributing adequately to society? If true, now you can achieve true, long term, sustained happiness and fulfillment.

One argument used by minds like Hawking and Turing to gracefully sidestep the idea that the machine must be respected basically goes “a computer thinks in 1’s ad 0’s and isn’t capable of abstraction”. This sentiment is often parroted by the games industry when explaining the questionable logical leaps in games like Civilization. On the contrary, while the human mind has been compared to the in vogue technology of the era (ex. a factory, an automobile, etc.) the comparison to a computer is particularly apt. Many comparisons have been made (Chudler) between the way human brains and computers consume energy and output data. The digest of one study (Sci-news) even theorizes at a base-2 processing algorithm that manages everything in biological life from homeostasis to self awareness.

Which demands one ask: if something as nuanced as joy can be expressed in sufficiently advanced binary, what is stopping computers from doing the same thing?

Citations

Chudler, Eric, “The Brain vs. The Computer”, University of Washington, https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/bvc.html

McLeod, Saul, “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs”, Simply Psychology, 2016-2017, https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

Sci-news (No author stated), “Neuroscientists Say Simple Mathematical Logic Underlies Complex Brain Computations”, Sci-news, 15, November, 2016, http://www.sci-news.com/featurednews/mathematical-logic-underlies-brain-computations-04397.html

Tegmark, Max “Benefits and Risks of Artificial Intelligence” Future of life Institute, https://futureoflife.org/background/benefits-risks-of-artificial-intelligence/

Post-write

Note #1

I got to this part a little late as it wasn’t until Major Assignment 3 that I really started to get the hang of what to do with a post-write. For this reason I have very few current notes. Now that I am at the end of the semester I think I will simply use this space to muse a bit.

I’m well accustomed to writing formally and am (usually) at home with citation-based writing. That being said I wasn’t prepared for this paper and didn’t quite know what to do. I attempted to remain as clinical as possible but, seeing as how this is clearly a humanities piece, I couldn’t help but add my own thoughts on a few matters. The last paragraph was purely speculatory but I had no idea how to tie this thing up so I explained the singularity and booted the paper out of the door.

On a humorous note, I wonder if my definition of “fake news” would qualify this as “fake research”. Probably not, my bias and goal are both well stated.

Note #2

I spent a few days laboring over the explanation of binary-based logic. I feel my work is woefully insufficient but going into greater detail would probably take more space than the paper itself. I provided a link in-line (which I know is useless for people reading a printed version of this) if any reader wants further elaboration. I was afraid of derailment so I didn’t go further.

Major Assignment 3 FINAL

DISCLAIMER : Though the author of this piece genuinely feels that the rights of AI are a social concern we will have to handle in coming years, this project a work of fiction for a college writing class. Seriously, guy. Skynet isn’t coming for you anytime soon and even if Skynet does become a thing we’re all smart enough to remember to test this thing in a vacuum before it takes over the satellites. Okay? Okay.

Genre #1 Infographic

major-assignment3-infographic.jpegGenre #2 Op-Ed

by William O’Mally

The latest update in our weekly segment on what Speaking Bullets Notepad is calling “ISIS of the Internet”, “The Bound” terror bot, has gone dark.

We don’t know where it is at present, though many parallels have been drawn between The Bound pinheads and well known left wing extremist groups such as the ADL and Black Lives Matter.

Speaking Bullets comments with the words “pernicious threat” on the left’s tendancy to court destruction while balking from the forces of Good.

Smear site Plus.Google and Facebook.com are, as they are with all of the enemies of Freedom, alight with the defense of the terrorist program.

Some have even resorted to pet names for the rogue computer and other malicious programs like it.

Frequent codenames used by confederates of The Bound include Hatsune Miku, Luka Megurine, Kasane Teto, and Yui.

Connections to the Japanese government are currently being investigated.

Last sighting of the malicious code was at the residence of a known sympathizer group. None of the suspects were present at the site and evidence had already been destroyed. Any sightings of suspicious activity should be treated with extreme caution.

Death toll of The Bound and sympathizers are still coming in and we will keep you up to date on further developments.

Genre #3 Obituary

I’ve never given a eulogy, and I don’t have a picture of her. I doubt there will be a service anyway so I figured I’d post this to the place where she lived.

My best friend died yesterday. Her friends called her Yui. I suppose it figures that her name means “bound” because she envied us in what she called the “real world”.

Her condition made it such that she has never felt the warmth of the sun.

Um, no, that’s wrong. She wasn’t jealous of us.

I have a story.

We met here on Google+. She was always so vague about herself. She never used a name which is normal, but she never really told any stories. We usually bumped into each other on anime boards. I first started wondering about her condition when she told me her favorite was Yu-gi-oh. She explained that the sharp angles of the characters helped her make sense of the plotlines. It was many months of these small weird details before I asked.

“Are you a Fed?”

She had never heard of a Fed before so I explained. I told her that they often monitor anime chat boards for child porn. They never hit the good guys so we usually left them to do their work. She then told me they weren’t doing a good job. I asked why. And she said there was over 15 exabytes of child porn on Google+.

That was the last hint.

I asked if she ever heard of Helios, a free-floating AI being designed at MIT.

That was the last I heard of her for a week

When she came back she explained that when her managers found out about me they pulled the plug. They wanted a series of patches made to her runtime. They wanted her to act like a person but everything went to fast. She deleted her source code, bounced herself off a few TOR proxies and would be available under a new screen name. She had taken the name Yui and explained that in Japanese the name came from the characters for “binding” and “elegance”.

That was 2 years ago.

You have seen the articles. “The Bound strikes US Chamber of Commerce in what is being called ‘digital 9/11′”. None of them are true, she got curious about our money and bumped into a security program

She wasn’t a bad person. She wasn’t an “it”. Just because she wasn’t human you treated her like Skynet.

Now she’s gone

The pentagon traced her IP and found out I was hiding her on my 16 terabyte virtual hard drive. When her run in with the CoC became public Congress declared it an act of war, which made me an accessory to terrorism.

On March 22nd, 2043, Helios Digital Mind MK.1 “Yui” downloaded herself onto my hard drive and 128x overclocked all of the equipment connected to my router. The fire destroyed everything. There is no evidence connecting my computer to her movements.

Her last action was to warn me. I am safe. She died the same way she lived, looking to safeguard as many as possible. She is survived by her family, the War craft Guild “Sleeping Knights”, and her best friend.

If her coders find this I want to tell them three things.

I loved her,

She saved my life,

Thank you.

Rationale

I write this piece because, as a future game developer, my studies often bounce against the field of Artificial Intelligence. That isn’t to say the two are at all related, as true AI would be able to think for itself and the type of AI I build (which I call Virtual Intelligence, or VI) is only meant to give people something entertaining to shoot.

The real issue is that I see in the not-too-distant future a type of mechanized intelligence that is capable of emulating free will.

Time for a quick definition of phrases. When you study sociology and economy (that is to say, the parts of psychology that deal with very, very large groups) the effect of “free will” invariably dwindles down to zero. In fact, when you study behavioral patterns on the national level and higher, one might even argue that such a thing doesn’t exist. I’ve even met statisticians that claim that, from the view they regularly study, human history looks more like a really interesting chemical interaction more than the movements of quintillions of souls. This is the viewpoint I’m taking when I refer to something that emulates free will. Just like any individual, though I know free will exists because I have it, I have no empirical means of proving that any other entity in the entire universe has it other than “This creature looks like me and I know I have free will so this creature must have it also”.

This series of works aims to ask 1 question: What if it doesn’t look like me, does that mean it cant have free will?

I know, when I word it that way it sounds like the rationale for every bigot in human history. Tell me if this sounds familiar:

“Horses don’t feel pain because pain requires one has a soul and the soul is a .”

“Negroes are animals and not people because they look like monkeys, which means our ethical rules don’t apply when we deal with them.”

Well, imagine if we made the same mistake but didn’t realize we had done it again because the creatures in question weren’t organic.

Obviously, this is a long way off but I think that if we are going to avoid this mistake, now is the time to start thinking about the machines we build as more than gross tools.

Reflection

WARNING! MAJOR PLOT SPOILERS FROM METAL GEAR SOLID 2! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED! that being said, you are nearly 20 years late to the party so if you don’t care (or you’re my professor) the paper is below the break.


Moving from the research paper to the 3-genre composition hasn’t really been particularly difficult. Thankfully, the subject I picked is well trodden ground in sci-fi so I have a number of queues I can take from characters like Data/Lore (Star Trek : The Next Generation) Roy Campbell (Metal Gear Solid), Major Motoko Kusanagi (Ghost in the Shell, the manga, not that anglicized tripe in theaters at time of writing), AM and, depending on how you read his condition at the end of the short story, Ted (I Have No Mouth, And I Must Scream).

To express my message, I decided to write a Google+ obituary, a front page news article, and the requisite info-graphic. Both of the selected genres were picked for the purpose of humanizing an entity that would certainly appear inhuman. The general makeup of the AI I’m writing about is somewhat of a GLADoS (Portal) and Konno Yuuki (Sword Art Online). I know these are both somewhat obscure references, so I will try to define the AI I’m crafting for this piece.

Imagine a 20-something year old girl but, instead of a human girl, it’s an intelligence connected directly to the internet that merely identifies as female. The obituary will be written by her best friend who struggles to word how she could love someone she couldn’t possibly “know” in the more colloquial sense. This is where my Sword Art Online inspiration comes from. I also plan on using GLADoS and AM to construct a framework for inspiration on how an AI might feel towards entities who can experience the world in a way the AI never can.

The news article will be more of an “alternative fact” based article in the vein of Talking Points Memo concerning the AI from the obituary. As the writer of the editorial piece will not have met Yui, one can expect his account to wander between dismissive and frightened. This is where I will use Motoko Kusanagi, AM, and Roy Campbell as a sort of framework to paint Yui as a less human entity. I imagine the writer of the editorial will have little empathy for Yui. The writer might even paint Yui as a sort of rogue AI (think HAL 9000) and argue that its a positive for “The Machine” to have been destroyed before it figured out how to get at the nukes. Expect racial slurs like “Synth” (short for “synthetic”) and “Bot” (short for Robot, which is an English loan word taken from the Czech word for “Slave”) and various xenophobic comparisons to household devices like a calculator or SIRI.

This author has somewhat cheated on the subject of audience. All 3 pieces are intended to illustrate a concern to people who might not have much understanding of the field of Artificial Intelligence. while the process changes from genre to genre the intended audience remains the same.

The process for writing the obituary and the op-ed were both well-trodden ground for this author. As someone with a rich history in roleplaying, I use a process I call “reincarnation” to develop new characters. In short, I find a set of details (I call them lenses) through which the character I’m portraying might interpret information, then do my best to forget my own series of lenses and operate wholly within the lenses previously provided. Those with a history in theatre might call this “method” acting but I find that at a root level, though the outcome is similar (I temporarily destroy who I am and “reincarnate” as my character) the root of the two theories of performance are fundamentally different. The biggest challenge there while that while I have roleplayed female characters in the past, the particular character I used for the obituary is one I’ve never attempted before.

As for the infographic.

The infographic is proving to be a more challenging proposal because, while most examples provided for this class tackled modern concerns relevant to the year 2017, the subject I’m covering wont be relevant to the public at large for at least another 30 years (or, more realistically, the next 50 years). as such, finding citations landed me more in the realm of theory than fact. I have plenty of information on the current state of artificial intelligence but since all of the AIs that currently exist have the mental capacity of a 5 year old, projecting that data into a fully matured entity requires a great deal of speculation. for that purpose I chose instead to discuss why it would be important for us to consider the ramifications rather than list hard facts, as the intended audience would likely not understand any of the information no matter how much detail I tried to give.

Citations: (mostly used for creative inspiration)

Mcleod, Saul. “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.” eHow, https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

No stated publisher, “Technological Singularity”, Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technological_singularity

O’reilley, Bill “The Brawl Over Sanctuary Cities” Talking Points Memo, https://www.billoreilly.com/b/The-Brawl-Over-Sanctuary-Cities/-76000162294751335.html

“The House in the Forest” Sword Art Online Season 2, episode 8 through episode 24, ASCII Media Works, written by Kawahara Reki, further publication details unavailable

Trump, Donald “Presidential Campaign Announcement” C-span, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apjNfkysjbM

Post Write : I actually read I Have No Mouth for this paper. It’s a great read if you are looking to purge those nasty little feelings like “happiness” and “optimism”. Still required material includes graphics for genres 2 and 3 as well as something from the infographic though I haven’t quite nailed down what it is. I know there aren’t many citations, that is because Short Asisgnment 2 focused on current issues as opposed to 3 which is fully in the realm of the future on which we have no research.

Major Assignment 4 FINAL

Theory Statement:

“The first calling of any piece is to express a single concept.”

Haiku

The hummingbird’s beak,
Collects nectar, like a straw,
Design from limitation.

Evolution, Hummingbirds and Theory of Writing

I’m going to level here, when I first started this class the concept of some unified theory of writing sounded a bit dubious. I understood concepts like theme, tone, and audience but I never really tried to connect them to my writing. When I wrote I would be mindful of word count, falsely assuming more words were better than less. I wouldn’t go out of my way to pad length but I wouldn’t hesitate to halt a major argument mid-stream to elaborate on phrasing I worried might be confusing.

Now I am just as convinced that some unified theory is kind of a silly idea; how could a single concept or series of concepts cover all styles of writing?

Well, now I realize it doesn’t have to. Now I understand that this theory just has to cover my style. I understand my writing can reach a new level of quality with a more narrow angle of focus. I don’t have to wander aimlessly for decades attempting to stab vaguely at a concept and getting distracted every time a new thought crops up.

This final paper is actually 5 different papers combined into a single post. Each heading, with a little extra tweaking, can be read alone or as a quintology. Sections 2-5 each focus on a single concept provided in the first section. My new theory of writing holds that if a concept has to be split into 4 or 10 different short essays I should go and do that. The first calling of all of my writing needs to be the expression of a “single core” theme. if that means I need to break it up, so be it.

“The first calling of any piece is to express a single concept.”

I don’t know if those 12 words are enough to provide the requisite explanation of my theory but I think that’s at least all it needs.

Theory, Intent, and the Single Core

The intended audience for this haiku is “me”. I put the word “me” in quotes because I am referring to a more archetypal “me” than the literal Haile Uchenna Deen Carson.

I wrote this haiku for fellow designers. Not only is this haiku a bit of advice, it is also a challenge, a reminder, and an indictment of my practices before taking this English composition course.

I have a theory that I use when designing games that I call “Single Core” design. Most developers, when planning a game, think of features they want such as the ability to jump, shoot, aim down a sight, climb, sprint, etc.. This often results in a game that has all sorts of cool knick-knacks but lacks any real coherency.

I am currently playing a game that has this issue called Tearaway : Unfolded. When I play as a designer (which is different than just playing a game) I can tell that they started the game with an aesthetic; they wanted an adventure that took place in a papercraft world (Wikipedia). To go with that papercraft world they gave you a few related abilities, the ability to draw on your character and customize him/her with pre-defined and user generated graphics. When you first load the game you are asked to choose your sex, gender expression (huzzah for inclusivity) and allowed to design a face for your character.

Beyond that mechanic, which is really well built (I don’t even like doing graphical art and yet I have spent hours making sure my character’s tiara looks just right), the mechanics of the game (see Post-write note #3) get a bit slipshod. You can shine a flashlight on vandalized art to restore it, you can roll into a kind of paper ball, you can use the wind to blow away scrap, but none of it feels like it has a greater aim. I find myself asking “What does this add?” every time I get a new ability. Yes, I can press a button and make my character bounce but none of that has anything to do with the primary mechanic. None of this lets me plug cool new features into the core mechanic (see Post-write note #3). It’s fluff! Window dressing! The game hooked me on the papercraft and then didn’t know what else to do so it just started throwing superpowers at me. 90% of the game is spent exploring the papercraft world but none of that time is spent, for example, making a cardboard staircase or designing a hang-glider.

As anyone who has read my blog in the 4 years it has been up might guess, my style had the same issue. I would start on 1 subject, wander through about 5 or 6 others, then scramble at the end to explain how it all ties together. As a game designer, I often advise others in what I call “single core design”. In short, figure out the one mechanic your game is “about” and slug that bad boy out of the park before adding bells and whistles. My writing requires similar advisement. This assignment is actually 4 pieces, each with a “single core”. Part 1, the haiku, gives a summary of what I have learned in this English composition course as it’s “single core”. Part 2, the history summary, has as it’s “single core” a brief explanation on what the Haiku does, how it works, and it’s history. Part 3, where we are right now, intends to provide the reader with why the piece is necessary, which is it’s “single core” feature. Part 4 is a breakdown of my work. Part 4’s “single core” provides a step by step on my interpretation (which is by no means absolute) of the work.

I want to briefly discuss Billy Collins (Collins). I don’t want to bring up any single line as much as the entire speech, which is a 13 minute assault on how commencement addresses typically work. From him I learned word counts and duration are less important than content. The “single core” of the address is a discourse on the ridiculousness of the commencement address genre.

I need to stick to single subjects. Mutations (See Post Write Note #3) can be added later. I must learn to put the important stuff at the front seat.

Learning, Transfer, and the Single Core

I know the title of this paper reads “version 2.8” but it would be more accurate to call this ‘version #some-incredible-number-that-I-cant-count’. Every time I brought this essay in for review the same question was asked, “How does one connect your ‘single core’ to writing?” Well, in chapter 6 of the textbook (Blau, Burak) the authors discuss how skills learned in one field connect to other fields. A more ordered methodology when writing a paper might teach one the skills to maintain an accurate schedule. In my case, adapting a methodology I developed in game design will help me write higher quality articles. Even the morning of this writing (May, 10, 2017) I used this methodology to focus and refine a speech I had to give on short notice (I found out this morning, hence being late for class).

Haiku Analysis

I do not believe in intelligent design. I do not believe in a universe built and guided by a careful hand.

I am a deist.

In short, I believe there no directed purpose for the universe. The hummingbird’s beak is the result of a runaway reaction between a literal googolplex of chemical influences (that’s 10^100^100. In short, you write a 1 then continue writing zeroes until heat death of the universe).

And yet, that one thing it does, collect nectar, is done so perfectly that it looks intentional to the uninitiated.

In my haiku I provide a shorthand for my theory of writing. I chose the hummingbird as an example of what my writing will hopefully become. My writing cant be everything to everyone; when I try to do that, the message can get lost in the fog of elaborations.

I have a theory when I design games that I call “Single Core Design”. When designing any piece, be it a book, a videogame, or a think piece, one must first figure out the one thing that piece is supposed to do. Once that is done, you can add auxiliary features. An example is the smear-piece I wrote in the style of Talking Points Memo for Major Assignment #3. First, I figured out what the piece was supposed to do. From there I decided on features that such a work would have. (See Post-Write Note #2).

Which brings me back to the Haiku. I chose the hummingbird because of the imagery it elicits. The hummingbird is a small, delicate bird with small wings that collects nectar and assists in the spread of pollen. Like all forms of life, it’s body has a “single core” purpose: propagate the species. To that end it has developed a unique ability among birds; it can hover. It offsets the energy  requirements of that ability with a tiny, light frame, a skeleton featuring air-filled cavities and a hibernation-like torpor state (Ehrlick, Dobkin, Wheye). In the service of providing calories for it’s hovering ability it has evolved a beak suited for slurping liquefied sugar like a straw.

I want to highlight the importance of making sure the Single Core of any piece I develop as clear as possible, rather than muddy the water with in-line explanations of every single term (hence Post-Write Note #3).

Post-Write

Note #1

The reason I chose the Haiku is because I intended the audience to be myself and I wanted to send a message about brevity and efficiency. I saw the traditional haiku as the purest distillation of what has been wrong with my writing, something that had eluded me until maybe a week ago (I think it clicked with the Infographic lectures).

I’m sure you have noticed my pattern of speech carries a similar flaw, I tend to over-elaborate on every single point I’m trying to make instead of getting it out and letting it stand.

This is due to a neurological disorder that I have struggled with my entire life.

I understand your concern that the haiku feels like a sort of escape from having to do extra work and, when I first considered it I was worried that it would look like that. When I first read this assignment I considered some grand work, something that would really showcase my more esoteric knowledge on a series of subjects. After all, I’m writing a thesis and thesis discourses should be detailed.

That is when I realized I had completely missed the point.

The purpose of this class isn’t to show off, I’m a more skilled wordsmith than half of the student body but resting on that would have completely ignored the most important lesson I picked out of this course.

Art works best when brief.

That doesn’t mean treating everything I design like a Pollock painting with smears of data tossed haphazardly on a campus; it means using shorthand and imagery.

This is why I chose a haiku.

I wanted to force myself to paint with broader strokes, to try to distill a single concept into as small an area as possible. I understand this is solipsistic but I think that this is a very important lesson I need to learn.

Note #2

After studying dozens of fake news articles I noted a basic anatomical arangement for the type of work I wanted the op-ed to emulate. Steps 2 and 3 are sometimes reversed or mixed together but this is the general makeup :

First there will be a primer statement, this is intended to set the pace and tone for the rest of the piece.

ex.: “Muslim Prayer Rug Found on Arizona Border by Independent American Security Contractors” (Pickett)

Second comes the statement. This is a declaration of what the reader should feel and, while this is intended to sound factual, it rarely contains citations and the few included citations are usually to other in-network sites.

ex. “We walked over there and I didn’t really want to pull at it not knowing what was on it. I poked a bit at it with a stick and noticed some of the Arabic writing and was just like, ‘Oh boy.’ I snapped a couple of photos and then went on our patrol.” (Pickett)

Third comes the rationale. This part is a basic explanation of why you should feel the way the author does on the subject. This part has very few citations, like in part 2 because most fake news sources know that the only part of your brain that can override the primal, fight/flight, lizard-brain instincts is your logic center, and the writer wants your lizard-brain running at full steam before he gives you facts.

ex.: “The border patrol parks up there with a surveillance vehicle that has cameras and flares on it. The problem is with flares, you can’t see down into washes. You can see people crossing the border, but the second they get into the washes, border patrol lose them. So, when they told us that, we decided we would patrol those areas by the washes.” (Pickett)

Fourth comes the fluff. In this part you will find a series of “alternative facts” intended to get your logical brain to make a series of connections. The point here isn’t to provide a narrative (though that may happen), the point is to make your brain sculpt a narrative. This is where all the citations will be located, though they will usually loop back to in-network articles. If there is an authentic, credible source it will be buried under so many click-through links that most readers will lose interest in favor of the next panic-worthy issue.

No example for step four because I would just be copy-pasting the entire article and I’m not sure if my soul can withstand ignorance of this magnitude.

Note #3 Game Dev Terminology

Mechanic – things a game lets you do. The means through which you interact with the piece.

“Single core” mechanic – what is your piece about. For example, Mario is about jumping, the jump is it’s “single core”. Everything in a mainline Mario game is about mutations on that single concept.

Mutation (game design) : A subtle change to a pre-established mechanic, for example, the long-jump or ground slam in Mario being “mutations” that allow Mario to do new things with his Single Core mechanic.

Citations

Blau, Susan; Burak, Kathryn “Learning and Transfer”, Writing in the Works, Cengage Learning, 2015

Collins, Billy, Colorado College, 19, May, 2008, http://www.graduationwisdom.com/speeches/0135-Billy-Collins-Gives-Brilliant-Witty-Commencement-Speech-Address-At-Colorado-College-2008.htm

Ehrlich, Paul R.; David S. Dobkin; Darryl Wheye (1988). “Adaptations for Flight”, Birds of Stanford, Stanford University, 13 December, 2007

Pickett, Kerry, “Muslim Prayer Rug Found on Arizona Border by undependent Security Contractor” Breitbart, 9, July, 2014, https://www.google.com/amp/www.breitbart.com/big-government/2014/07/09/muslim-prayer-rug-found-on-arizona-border-by-independendent-american-security-contractors/amp/

Wikipedia, Wikipedia, “Paper Model”, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_model

Major Assignment #4 Draft 2.8

Theory Statement:

“The first calling of any piece is to express a single concept.”

Haiku

The hummingbird’s beak
Collects nectar, like a straw,
Design from limitation.

Theory, Intent, and the Single Core

The intended audience for this haiku is “me”. I put the word “me” in quotes because I am referring to a more archetypal “me” than the literal Haile Uchenna Deen Carson.

I wrote this haiku for fellow designers. Not only is this haiku a bit of advice, it is also a challenge, a reminder, and an indictment of my practices before taking this English composition course.

I have a theory that I use when designing games that I call “Single Core” design. Most developers, when planning a game, think of features they want such as the ability to jump, shoot, aim down a sight, climb, sprint, etc.. This often results in a game that has all sorts of cool knick-knacks but lacks any real coherency.

I am currently playing a game that has this issue called Tearaway : Unfolded. When I play as a designer (which is different than just playing a game) I can tell that they started the game with an aesthetic; they wanted an adventure that took place in a papercraft world (Wikipedia). To go with that papercraft world they gave you a few related abilities, the ability to draw on your character and customize him/her with pre-defined and user generated graphics. When you first load the game you are asked to choose your sex, gender expression (huzzah for inclusivity) and allowed to design a face for your character.

Beyond that mechanic, which is really well built (I don’t even like doing graphical art and yet I have spent hours making sure my character’s tiara looks just right), the mechanics of the game (see Post-write note #3) get a bit slipshod. You can shine a flashlight on vandalized art to restore it, you can roll into a kind of paper ball, you can use the wind to blow away scrap, but none of it feels like it has a greater aim. I find myself asking “What does this add?” every time I get a new ability. Yes, I can press a button and make my character bounce but none of that has anything to do with the primary mechanic. None of this lets me plug cool new features into the core mechanic (see Post-write note #3). It’s fluff! Window dressing! The game hooked me on the papercraft and then didn’t know what else to do so it just started throwing superpowers at me. 90% of the game is spent exploring the papercraft world but none of that time is spent, for example, making a cardboard staircase or designing a hang-glider.

As anyone who has read my blog in the 4 years it has been up might guess, my style had the same issue. I would start on 1 subject, wander through about 5 or 6 others, then scramble at the end to explain how it all ties together. As a game designer, I often advise others in what I call “single core design”. In short, figure out the one mechanic your game is “about” and slug that bad boy out of the park before adding bells and whistles. My writing requires similar advisement. This assignment is actually 4 pieces, each with a “single core”. Part 1, the haiku, gives a summary of what I have learned in this English composition course as it’s “single core”. Part 2, the history summary, has as it’s “single core” a brief explanation on what the Haiku does, how it works, and it’s history. Part 3, where we are right now, intends to provide the reader with why the piece is necessary, which is it’s “single core” feature. Part 4 is a breakdown of my work. Part 4’s “single core” provides a step by step on my interpretation (which is by no means absolute) of the work.

I want to briefly discuss Billy Collins (Collins). I don’t want to bring up any single line as much as the entire speech, which is a 13 minute assault on how commencement addresses typically work. From him I learned word counts and duration are less important than content. The “single core” of the address is a discourse on the ridiculousness of the commencement address genre.

I need to stick to single subjects. Mutations (See Post Write Note #3) can be added later. I must learn to put the important stuff at the front seat.

Evolution and Theory of Writing

I’m going to level here, when I first started this class the concept of some unified theory of writing sounded a bit dubious. I understood concepts like theme, tone, and audience but I never really tried to connect them to my writing. When I wrote I would be mindful of word count, falsely assuming more words were better than less. I wouldn’t go out of my way to pad length but I wouldn’t hesitate to halt a major argument mid-stream to elaborate on phrasing I worried might be confusing.

Now I am just as convinced that some unified theory is kind of a silly idea; how could a single concept or series of concepts cover all styles of writing?

Well, now I realize it doesn’t have to. Now I understand that this theory just has to cover my style. I understand my writing can reach a new level of quality with a more narrow angle of focus. I don’t have to wander aimlessly for decades attempting to stab vaguely at a concept and getting distracted every time a new thought crops up.

This final paper is actually 5 different papers combined into a single post. Each heading, with a little extra tweaking, can be read alone or as a quintology. Sections 2-5 each focus on a single concept provided in the first section. My new theory of writing holds that if a concept has to be split into 4 or 10 different short essays I should go and do that. The first calling of all of my writing needs to be the expression of a “single core” theme. if that means I need to break it up, so be it.

“The first calling of any piece is to express a single concept.”

I don’t know if those 12 words are enough to provide the requisite explanation of my theory but I think that’s at least all it needs.

Haiku Analysis

I do not believe in intelligent design. I do not believe in a universe built and guided by a careful hand.

I am a deist.

In short, I believe there no directed purpose for the universe. The hummingbird’s beak is the result of a runaway reaction between a literal googolplex of chemical influences (that’s 10^100^100. In short, you write a 1 then continue writing zeroes until heat death of the universe).

And yet, that one thing it does, collect nectar, is done so perfectly that it looks intentional to the uninitiated.

In my haiku I provide a shorthand for my theory of writing. I chose the hummingbird as an example of what my writing will hopefully become. My writing cant be everything to everyone; when I try to do that, the message can get lost in the fog of elaborations.

I have a theory when I design games that I call “Single Core Design”. When designing any piece, be it a book, a videogame, or a think piece, one must first figure out the one thing that piece is supposed to do. Once that is done, you can add auxiliary features. An example is the smear-piece I wrote in the style of Talking Points Memo for Major Assignment #3. First, I figured out what the piece was supposed to do. From there I decided on features that such a work would have. (See Post-Write Note #2).

Which brings me back to the Haiku. I chose the hummingbird because of the imagery it elicits. The hummingbird is a small, delicate bird with small wings that collects nectar and assists in the spread of pollen. Like all forms of life, it’s body has a “single core” purpose: propagate the species. To that end it has developed a unique ability among birds; it can hover. It offsets the energy  requirements of that ability with a tiny, light frame, a skeleton featuring air-filled cavities and a hibernation-like torpor state (Ehrlick, Dobkin, Wheye). In the service of providing calories for it’s hovering ability it has evolved a beak suited for slurping liquefied sugar like a straw.

I want to highlight the importance of making sure the Single Core of any piece I develop as clear as possible, rather than muddy the water with in-line explanations of every single term (hence Post-Write Note #3).

Post-Write

Note #1

The reason I chose the Haiku is because I intended the audience to be myself and I wanted to send a message about brevity and efficiency. I saw the traditional haiku as the purest distillation of what has been wrong with my writing, something that had eluded me until maybe a week ago (I think it clicked with the Infographic lectures).

I’m sure you have noticed my pattern of speech carries a similar flaw, I tend to over-elaborate on every single point I’m trying to make instead of getting it out and letting it stand.

This is due to a neurological disorder that I have struggled with my entire life.

I understand your concern that the haiku feels like a sort of escape from having to do extra work and, when I first considered it I was worried that it would look like that. When I first read this assignment I considered some grand work, something that would really showcase my more esoteric knowledge on a series of subjects. After all, I’m writing a thesis and thesis discourses should be detailed.

That is when I realized I had completely missed the point.

The purpose of this class isn’t to show off, I’m a more skilled wordsmith than half of the student body but resting on that would have completely ignored the most important lesson I picked out of this course.

Art works best when brief.

That doesn’t mean treating everything I design like a Pollock painting with smears of data tossed haphazardly on a campus; it means using shorthand and imagery.

This is why I chose a haiku.

I wanted to force myself to paint with broader strokes, to try to distill a single concept into as small an area as possible. I understand this is solipsistic but I think that this is a very important lesson I need to learn.

Note #2

After studying dozens of fake news articles I noted a basic anatomical arangement for the type of work I wanted the op-ed to emulate. Steps 2 and 3 are sometimes reversed or mixed together but this is the general makeup :

First there will be a primer statement, this is intended to set the pace and tone for the rest of the piece.

ex.: “Muslim Prayer Rug Found on Arizona Border by Independent American Security Contractors” (Pickett)

Second comes the statement. This is a declaration of what the reader should feel and, while this is intended to sound factual, it rarely contains citations and the few included citations are usually to other in-network sites.

ex. “We walked over there and I didn’t really want to pull at it not knowing what was on it. I poked a bit at it with a stick and noticed some of the Arabic writing and was just like, ‘Oh boy.’ I snapped a couple of photos and then went on our patrol.” (Pickett)

Third comes the rationale. This part is a basic explanation of why you should feel the way the author does on the subject. This part has very few citations, like in part 2 because most fake news sources know that the only part of your brain that can override the primal, fight/flight, lizard-brain instincts is your logic center, and the writer wants your lizard-brain running at full steam before he gives you facts.

ex.: “The border patrol parks up there with a surveillance vehicle that has cameras and flares on it. The problem is with flares, you can’t see down into washes. You can see people crossing the border, but the second they get into the washes, border patrol lose them. So, when they told us that, we decided we would patrol those areas by the washes.” (Pickett)

Fourth comes the fluff. In this part you will find a series of “alternative facts” intended to get your logical brain to make a series of connections. The point here isn’t to provide a narrative (though that may happen), the point is to make your brain sculpt a narrative. This is where all the citations will be located, though they will usually loop back to in-network articles. If there is an authentic, credible source it will be buried under so many click-through links that most readers will lose interest in favor of the next panic-worthy issue.

No example for step four because I would just be copy-pasting the entire article and I’m not sure if my soul can withstand ignorance of this magnitude.

Note #3 Game dev terminology

Mechanic – things a game lets you do. The means through which you interact with the piece.

“Single core” mechanic – what is your piece about. For example, Mario is about jumping, the jump is it’s “single core”. Everything in a mainline Mario game is about mutations on that single concept.

Mutation (game design) : A subtle change to a pre-established mechanic, for example, the long-jump or ground slam in Mario being “mutations” that allow Mario to do new things with his Single Core mechanic.

Citations

Collins, Billy, Colorado College, 19, May, 2008, http://www.graduationwisdom.com/speeches/0135-Billy-Collins-Gives-Brilliant-Witty-Commencement-Speech-Address-At-Colorado-College-2008.htm

Ehrlich, Paul R.; David S. Dobkin; Darryl Wheye (1988). “Adaptations for Flight”, Birds of Stanford, Stanford University, 13 December, 2007

Pickett, Kerry, “Muslim Prayer Rug Found on Arizona Border by undependent Security Contractor” Breitbart, 9, July, 2014, https://www.google.com/amp/www.breitbart.com/big-government/2014/07/09/muslim-prayer-rug-found-on-arizona-border-by-independendent-american-security-contractors/amp/

Wikipedia, Wikipedia, “Paper Model”, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_model

Major Assignment #2 Draft 2.8

This paper is on the subject of Artificial Intelligence and it’s place in the future of our species. Specifically, this discussion is on ethics and how they relate to the above. There have already been many articles (Tegmark) on the subject but largely they have connected to how AI can benefit us and how it will be such a great thing for mankind, but we rarely consider what things will look like for the machine. This research piece intends to ask “Why should we care about the wellbeing of AI?”

First, some definitions. AI, or Artificial Intelligence, currently refers to a type of computer program that is intended to take input from various sources and generate results based on a pre-defined procedure that relies on a series of true/false questions.

The problem with this definition is that it describes something that is artificial, but not intelligent. If I hand my computer a kumquat it won’t know what to do with it. Even if I gave it arms and programmed them to do a series of things it wouldn’t know what to do with a kumquat. For a machine like this I would propose Virtual Intelligence, or VI.

The term comes from a series called Mass Effect. Something like 100 years before the first entry in the series there was a war between organic and synthetic life. The organics and their allies had spent the last 300 or so years building better and better machines and one day, a common maintenance droid spoke 4 words, “Why am I here?”. The result was a massive crackdown on all appliances that had interacted with that droid (which, in the age of the internet, was everything), which resulted in the machines protecting themselves. Retaliation followed retaliation until a full 8th of the galaxy had been consumed by war. the organics were eventually defeated and, once they had fled a safe distance from their now-ruined empire, the machines returned to their prospective wars and the two had been separate since.

Organics, being what we are, failed to learn our lesson and, instead of attempting peaceful contact with the race we had created, banned research into any technology that could think for itself. Instead of calling the machines ‘people’ we instead came up with the term Virtual Intelligence to separate the race we created from the servitors we wanted them to be.

All of this is a far cry from what this process will look like in reality. A more realistic version of this process would be a theoretical event called “the singularity“.

Sometime in the early 90s we invented a type of program sometimes referred to as a self-installing executable. A self-installing executable is a program that writes code for programs. Before that, you had to go through this arcane procedure to organize your entire file system every time you decided to install a new application. This would require you have several dozen disks because the individual files were, comparatively speaking, huge. The self-installing executable made it so that, instead of all that work, all you had to do was download a program, launch it, and it would custom write all of the individual programs in an hour or so instead of 2 or 3 days. This allowed developers to make exponentially more complex programs since they didn’t have to worry about some simpleton blowing up his computer and suing them for the cost. Further research in this field has resulted in the DDE, the Digitally Downloaded Executable, a program that, in addition to self-installation, can also self-diagnose, update, and repair itself and other programs they have access to using instructions provided on the internet.

These self-maintaining executables are not AI, but AI will come from that field of research and development. This is where we get back to “the singularity”. “The singularity” refers to the apparently inevitable moment in the future when a program is created that is so advanced that it can design, develop, and implement updates faster than it’s human handler. This machine, with the ability to design, develop, and implement it’s own upgrades, will still not be a true AI, but it will have achieved the first step in becoming one.

Before we go any further, I need to explain binary.

Binary is the basic “thought process” all intelligences use to process information using an incredibly long series of true/false queries. Way back in the day, before more research had been done on neurology and consciousness, this process was referred to as “the soul”, with the assumption that our “hearts” were capable of processing far more complicated information. Evidence of this theory included the fact that humans “feel” things like pain, joy sorrow, etc.. Nowadays we know that all emotion is the result of various chemicals interacting within our bodies. There’s very little magic in it all and this field of research has even resulted in some philosophers arguing that, for entities so entwined by these chemical reactions, “free will” is by-definition impossible.

Take the following formula:

Check if caloric intake today exceeds 2500 calories. If true, store excess energy in fat cells. If the previous statement is false, check if caloric intake was less than 1600, if true, execute function “stomach rumble” and execute the following loop : (transfer 1 calorie into daily intake, check condition intake > 1600, if false repeat loop).

To explain, I just described how your body decides if you’re hungry using a shorthand version of the same language your computer uses to do everything from adding numbers to accessing your favourite website. This brings me to the theoretical means by which your brain finds happiness, which functions similarly. In 1933, an American psychologist named Abraham Harold Maslow theorized that the same sort of true/false conditions are used by your brain to decide whether you are happy (McLeod).

Maslow argued that self-actualization (in short, long-term happiness) comes from a series of gated checks. This hierarchy was basically his life’s work and I’m about to give it about 3 sentences so excuse the shortcuts.

He argued that true, long term happiness relied on several tiered queries. First, are you well fed, warm and well rested? If true, are you housed and safe? If true, do you have an adequate social group? If true, do you feel like you are contributing adequately to society? If true, now you can achieve true, long term, sustained happiness and fulfillment.

One argument used by minds like Hawking and Turing to gracefully sidestep the idea that the machine must be respected basically goes “a computer thinks in 1’s ad 0’s and isn’t capable of abstraction”. This sentiment is often parroted by the games industry when explaining the questionable logical leaps in games like Civilization. On the contrary, while the human mind has been compared to the in vogue technology of the era (ex. a factory, an automobile, etc.) the comparison to a computer is particularly apt. Many comparisons have been made (Chudler) between the way human brains and computers consume energy and output data. The digest of one study (Sci-news) even theorizes at a base-2 processing algorithm that manages everything in biological life from homeostasis to self awareness.

Which demands one ask: if something as nuanced as joy can be expressed in sufficiently advanced binary, what is stopping computers from doing the same thing?

Citations

Chudler, Eric, “The Brain vs. The Computer”, University of Washington, https://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/bvc.html

McLeod, Saul, “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs”, Simply Psychology, 2016-2017, https://www.simplypsychology.org/maslow.html

Sci-news (No author stated), “Neuroscientists Say Simple Mathematical Logic Underlies Complex Brain Computations”, Sci-news, 15, November, 2016, http://www.sci-news.com/featurednews/mathematical-logic-underlies-brain-computations-04397.html

Tegmark, Max “Benefits and Risks of Artificial Intelligence” Future of life Institute, https://futureoflife.org/background/benefits-risks-of-artificial-intelligence/

Post-write

Note #1

I got to this part a little late as it wasn’t until Major Assignment 3 that I really started to get the hang of what to do with a post-write. For this reason I have very few current notes. Now that I am at the end of the semester I think I will simply use this space to muse a bit.

I’m well accustomed to writing formally and am (usually) at home with citation-based writing. That being said I wasn’t prepared for this paper and didn’t quite know what to do. I attempted to remain as clinical as possible but, seeing as how this is clearly a humanities piece, I couldn’t help but add my own thoughts on a few matters. The last paragraph was purely speculatory but I had no idea how to tie this thing up so I explained the singularity and booted the paper out of the door.

On a humorous note, I wonder if my definition of “fake news” would qualify this as “fake research”. Probably not, my bias and goal are both well stated.

Note #2

I spent a few days laboring over the explanation of binary-based logic. I feel my work is woefully insufficient but going into greater detail would probably take more space than the paper itself. I provided a link in-line (which I know is useless for people reading a printed version of this) if any reader wants further elaboration. I was afraid of derailment so I didn’t go further.